Bread, Rolls, Pies, and Pastry


Carrot bread Louemma Russell Smith

Get out your blender—it is such a handy appliance.
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup pecans
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup salad oil
Heat the oven to 350°. Grease a 9x5x3 inch loaf pan. Sift the flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt into a large mixing bowl and set it aside. Chop the nuts in the blender and add them to the dry ingredients. Put the eggs, sugar, oil, and vanilla into the blender container. Cover and process it on “mix” until it’s smooth. Stop the blender and add the carrot pieces, cover it and process for four cycles on “liquefy”. Pour it into the dry ingredients and mix it only until the dry ingredients are moistened. Pour it into the prepared pan and bake it for one hour until the cake tester comes out clean. Cool it for five minutes in the pan, and let it cool completely before frosting it with the Lemon Glaze.
For the Lemon Glaze:
1 cup powdered confectioners sugar
1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon milk
Put all of the ingredients into a container. Use a mini-container if you have one. Process at “blend” until the sugar is liquefied. Pour it over the bread, spreading with a spatula so the glaze drizzles down the side.

Hot cross buns Jayne Barnes Raso

Thaw one pound of frozen white bread dough on a greased cookie sheet. Cover it with a moist cloth and let it rise until it’s double in bulk. Cut the dough into twelve equal pieces and flatten each piece into a three inch round on a a floured surface. Sprinkle each round with 1/2 teaspoon of sugar and one tablespoon of raisins and a dash of cinnamon. Pinch the dough together to enclose the raisins and seal it. Place the balls, smooth side up, on a greased cookie sheet and brush it with the beaten egg. Let it rise, uncovered, until doubled, about thirty minutes. Bake it in a preheated 375° oven for 15-20 minutes or until richly browned. Cool it on the rack, then frost it while it’s still warm with the powdered sugar and milk icing in the traditional cross design.
Editor’s note: check the index for dough recipes.

Blueberry coffee cake Vicki Bongiorno Konsavage

2 cups flour
1 cup sugar
3 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup shortening
2 beaten eggs
1 cup milk
1 1/2 cups blueberries
1 1/3 cups flaked coconut
Mix and sift the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the shortening. Combine the eggs and milk and stir it into the dry ingredients. Fold in the blueberries. Divide the batter between two greased eight or nine inch pans and sprinkle coconut evenly over the tops. Bake it at 375° for twenty five minutes.

Easy yeast rolls Lou Emma Russell Smith

1 box white cake mix
1 package dry yeast
1 1/4 cups warm water
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 1/2-3 cups flour
Mix the cake mix and dry yeast thoroughly, then combine the warm water and salt. Stir in the dry mix. Gradually work in the flour (you may need a bit more or less) to make a soft dough that can be handled well. Mix it well in the bowl with your hand. Cover it and set in a warm place for one hour, then punch it down and shape it into any size rolls you wish to make. Brush them with oil or melted margarine and place them on a greased sheet to rise once more, about two hours. Then bake them at 400° until they are golden brown. To reheat them, wrap them in foil and place them in the oven at 350° until hot. These stay fresh and soft for several days.

Strawberry-cranberry pie Zelma Lenon Submitted by Steve McGrew
1 package cranberries
1 peeled orange, seeds removed
1 unpeeled orange, seeds removed
3 stalks celery
2 peeled apples
Grind it all in a food chopper and add two cups of sugar. In another bowl mix two packages of strawberry gelatin and 1 1/2 cups of boiling water. Stir it until the gelatin dissolves and mix the bowls together.
Chill it until it sets.
Editor’s note: The image is a flowering cranberry bush.

Dilly cheese bread Jayne Barnes Raso

7 1/2 tablespoons oil or melted butter
4 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 cups sharp cheddar cheese
3 cups flour
7 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 beaten egg
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup milk
1 tablespoon oil
1/2 teaspoon dill
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
Preheat the oven to 350°. Generously grease a 9x5 inch loaf pan or six cup bundt pan. Combine the flour, baking powder, salt, cheese, and sugar in a large bowl. Combine the remaining ingredients in a second bowl and mix it well. Stir it into the dry ingredients, blending thoroughly, beating until the lumps are removed. Turn it into the pan and bake it until it’s golden, 45-50 minutes.
Editor’s note: Hundreds of types of cheese from various countries are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal’s diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses, such as Red Leicester, is produced by adding annatto. Other ingredients may be added to some cheeses, such as black pepper, garlic, chives, or cranberries.
For a few cheeses, the milk is curdled by adding acids such as vinegar or lemon juice. Most cheeses are acidified to a lesser degree by bacteria, which turn milk sugars into lactic acid, then the addition of rennet completes the curdling. Vegetarian alternatives to rennet are available; most are produced by fermentation of the fungus Mucor miehei.

Nancy’s cool bread Nancy Russell Ebersohl

Place nine cups of unsifted flour in a large enough sealable plastic container. In the center, make a well with a spoon.
Scald 1 1/2 cups of milk and cool it with 1 1/2 cups of water. Add 2/3 cup of sugar, two teaspoons of salt, four beaten eggs and two packages of yeast. Pour the liquid into the well—do not stir it.
Seal and whisper the air and wait until the seal pops off; do not break the seal.
Melt 1/2 pound of margarine, pour it into a bowl, and mix it. Add more flour if it’s needed. Knead it to the proper dough consistency. Seal it and whisper the air. Wait until the seal pops.
Knead it and roll it out. It makes three loaves of bread. Let it rise in the pan for twenty minutes, then bake it at 375° until it’s brown.

Cheese cake pie Sherry Smith Alstat

3 eggs
2/3 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon almond extract
8 ounces cream cheese
1 cup dairy sour cream
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
Mix the cream cheese, eggs, 2/3 cup of sugar, and the almond extract together. Pour it into a lightly greased nine inch glass pie plate. Bake it in a 350° oven for twenty five minutes.
Remove it from the oven and let it cool for fifteen minutes. Blend the sour cream, one tablespoon of sugar, and the vanilla, and spread it over the pie. Return it to the 350° oven for ten minutes. Makes 6-8 servings.

Aunt Beat’s refrigerator rolls Vicki Bongiorno Konsavage

Dissolve:
2 cakes yeast
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 cup warm water
Combine:
2 cups boiling water
1/4 cup shortening
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon salt
Let it cool. Add two beaten eggs and the yeast mixture. Stir in four cups of flour and beat it well. Stir in four more cups of flour and knead it lightly. Place the dough in a greased bowl. Grease it on top and store it in the refrigerator until needed, then make it into rolls. Let it rise 2 1/2-3 hours, then bake it for twenty minutes at 375°.

Cranberry pie Zelma Lenon Submitted by Steve McGrew

Cream together one stick of room temperature margarine and one cup of sugar. Add one cup of self-rising flour and two eggs, making a batter.
Put half of the batter in a Pyrex pan. Cover it with one can of whole cranberry sauce and 1/2-2/3 cup of crushed pineapple. Cover it with the remaining batter, then sprinkle on 1/2 cup of broken pecans.
Bake it at 300° for about an hour.

Refrigerator rolls Bonnie Lou Smith Wyatt

This is an excellent recipe for rolls. The dough will keep in a refrigerator for a week or ten days.
2 cups boiling water
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon salt
2 cakes yeast
2 tablespoons shortening
1/4 cup lukewarm water
1 teaspoon sugar
2 eggs
8 cups plain flour
Mix the boiling water, 1/2 cup of sugar, salt and shortening. Let it cool to lukewarm. Soften the yeast in 1/4 cup lukewarm water and add one teaspoon of sugar and stir it into the first mixture. Add the beaten eggs and stir in half of the flour until it’s well mixed, then add the remainder of the flour. Mix it, but do not knead it. Cover it and let it set in the refrigerator for at least two hours. Shape it into balls, put it in a greased pan and let it rise in a warm room until it’s double in bulk (about 3 hours). Bake it in a 400° oven.
Editor’s note: The first cooling systems for food involved using ice. Artificial refrigeration began in the mid 1750s, and developed in the early 1800s. In 1834, the first working vapor-compression refrigeration system was built. The first commercial ice-making machine was invented in 1854. In 1913, refrigerators for home use were invented. In 1923 Frigidaire introduced the first self-contained unit. The introduction of Freon in the 1920s expanded the refrigerator market during the 1930s. Home freezers as separate compartments (larger than necessary just for ice cubes) were introduced in 1940. Frozen foods, previously a luxury item, became commonplace.

From scratch “Lenon” ginger bread Raymond C. Nichols

3 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 tablespoon ginger
Sift all of the above ingredients together. Cream together:
1/2 cup lard or margarine
1 cup sugar (brown can be used but add an extra cup)
Add two eggs and beat it well. Add:
1 cup sorghum molasses
1 1/2 cups boiling water
Add half of the flour mixture and one cup of water. Beat it on low speed for one minute. Add the remaining hot water and beat the mixture on low speed for one minute. Grease a pan with solid shortening (lard or shortening) and bake it in an 8x15 inch pan for 25-30 minutes in a pre-heated 350° oven.
Editor’s note: Gingerbread is claimed to have been brought to Europe in 992 A.D. by the Armenian monk Gregory of Nicopolis (also called Gregory Makar and Grégoire de Nicopolis). He left Nicopolis, in modern-day western Greece, to live in Bondaroy (north-central France), near the town of Pithiviers. He stayed there for seven years and taught gingerbread baking to French Christians. He died in 999.
In the thirteenth century, gingerbread was brought to Sweden by German immigrants. In fifteenth century Germany, a gingerbread guild controlled production. Early references from the Vadstena Abbey show that the Swedish nuns baked gingerbread to ease indigestion in 1444.

Nut roll Eileen E. Bongiorno Karas

1 package hot roll mix
2 tablespoons warm water
3 tablespoons sugar
1/4 cup margarine or butter
1/3 cup sour cream
Filling:
1 egg
2 cups ground walnuts
2/3 cup honey
1/4 cup sour cream
Grease a 13x9 inch pan. In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast from the hot roll mix in water. In a large bowl, mix the cream, sugar, and margarine. Add 1/3 cup of sour cream and two beaten eggs, mixing them well. Stir in the yeast and flour from the mix and blend them well. Cover it loosely with plastic and let it rise in a warm place for forty five minutes.
In a medium bowl, beat one egg and reserve one tablespoon for brushing on the cake. Add the remaining filling ingredients. On a well-floured surface, knead the dough until it is no longer sticky, about 1-2 minutes. Divide it into three parts and roll out one part to a 12x10 inch rectangle. Spread it with 2/3 cup of filling spreading to within half an inch of the edge. Starting with the longer side, roll up and pinch the edges to seal it. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Place the seam side down in a pan. Cover it and let rise in a warm place for thirty minutes.
Heat your oven to 350°. Brush the coffee cake with the egg mixture and bake it for 35-40 minutes. Makes three cakes.

Buttermilk rolls Mary Jacobson Nichols

1 cake yeast
1 cup warm water
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup shortening
enough flour to make stiff dough
Dissolve the yeast in a cup of warm water. Dissolve the baking soda in a cup of buttermilk. Sift together two cups of flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Cut in the shortening, then add the liquid and enough flour to knead a stiff dough. Let it rise two hours. Knead the dough down and cut it into twenty four rolls. Turn it over in shortening and set it to rise for baking, two or more hours. Bake it for ten minutes in a 400° oven.
Editor’s note: Buttermilk refers to a number of dairy drinks. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cultured cream. This type of buttermilk is known as traditional buttermilk.
The term buttermilk also refers to a range of fermented milk drinks, common in warm climates (for instance, the Balkans, the Middle East, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua and the Southern United States) where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly, as well as in colder climates, such as Scandinavia, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and the Czech Republic. This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cow’s milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria—either Lactococcus lactis or Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

Butter crust bread Cleda Weaver Vaughn submitted bv Zona Bishop Lenon
2 packages yeast
2 cups 115° warm milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon salt
2 eggs
1/4 cup salad oil
6-6 1/2 cups flour
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
Dissolve the yeast in the warm milk. Stir in the sugar, salt, eggs, oil, and three cups of flour to make the dough easy to handle. Turn the dough onto a floured board and knead it, adding extra flour as you knead; 8-10 minutes.
Place it in a greased bowl and turn it so the greased side is up. Cover it and let it rise until it’s double, about one hour. Punch the dough down and knead it until it is smooth and satiny. Let it rise again until it is doubled in size, then divide the dough in half. Roll each half Into an 18x9 inch rectangle. Roll this rectangle, starting with the short end. With the side of your hand press each end to seal it. Fold the ends under the loaf.
Place one tablespoon of butter or margarine in each bread pan and heat it in a preheated oven until it’s melted. Turn each loaf in butter until it is coated. Let it rise until it’s doubled, about one hour. Heat the oven to 375°. Place the loaves on the lower oven rack so the tops are in the center of the oven far enough apart that the pans do not touch. Bake 30-35 minutes or until they’re golden brown. Remove them from the pans, brush the loaves with butter and cool them on a wire rack. Makes two nice loaves.
Editor’s note: Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods. Evidence from 30,000 years ago in Europe revealed starch residue on rocks used for pounding plants. It is possible that during this time, there was a primitive form of flatbread.

Oatmeal bread Jeanette Morgan Crown

4 cups boiling water
2 cups rolled oats
7 1/2-8 cups all-purpose flour, preferably unbleached
2 packages active dry yeast
2 tablespoons salt (you can use less!)
4 tablespoons salad oil
1/2 cup molasses (also very good with honey!)
Pour the boiling water over the oatmeal in a large bowl and leave it to cool, then stir in two cups of flour and the yeast. Place it in a warm, draft-free spot and allow it to rise, uncovered, until it has doubled in bulk. Punch it down and work in the salt, salad oil, molasses and enough of the remaining flour to make a stiff dough. Turn it out on a floured board and knead it, adding extra flour if necessary, to make a smooth, pliable, firm dough; about ten minutes, but you cannot knead it too much. Divide the dough into three equal pieces and form them into loaves to fit three buttered 9x5x3 inch loaf tins.
Allow them to rise again, uncovered, until doubled in bulk. Bake them in a preheated 350° oven for 40-60 minutes or until the bread sounds hollow when removed from the tins and rapped on top and bottom. Cool them on racks before slicing. Makes three loaves.

Quick ginger bread for a small family Gladys Russell Morgan

1/4 cup shortening
1/4 cup sugar
1 egg
1/4 cup molasses
1 cup sifted flour
1/2 cup hot water
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
Slowly melt the shortening in a saucepan. Cool it and add the sugar, molasses, and egg. Beat it well and sift together the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and salt. Add them alternately with hot water to the first mixture. Line a 9 1/4x5 1/4x2 1/2 inch greased loaf pan with greased wax paper and pour in the batter. Bake it in a 350° oven for forty five minutes and cool it for five minutes. It’s delicious served warm with ice cream.
Editor’s note: Gingerbread refers to a broad category of baked goods, typically flavored with ginger, cloves, nutmeg or cinnamon and sweetened with honey, sugar or molasses. Gingerbread foods vary, ranging from a soft, moist loaf cake to something close to a ginger biscuit.
Originally, the term gingerbread (from Latin zingiber via Old French gingebras) referred to preserved ginger. It then referred to a confection made with honey and spices. Gingerbread is often used to translate the French term pain d'épices (literally “spice bread”) or the German term Lebkuchen.
The first documented trade of gingerbread biscuits dates to the seventeenth century, where they were sold in monasteries, pharmacies, and town square farmers’ markets.

Cranberry nut bread Loudene Lenon Davis

1-2 cups fresh coarsely chopped cranberries
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup shortening
3/4 cup orange juice
1 tablespoon grated orange rind
1 well beaten egg
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Sift the flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt together. Cut in the shortening until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Combine the orange juice and grated rind with the well beaten egg.
Pour all of it at once into the dry ingredients, mixing just enough to dampen them. Carefully fold in the chopped nuts and cranberries. Spoon it into a greased 9x5x3 inch pan. Spread the corners and sides slightly higher than center. Bake it at 350° for about an hour until the crust is golden brown and a wood pick inserted comes out clean. Remove it from the pan and cool it. Store it overnight for easy slicing. Makes one loaf.
Editor’s note: Nut breads can be found in the United States and in Central European cuisines. In the United States, “nut roll” is a more or less generic name for pastries of this type, no matter where they originate. Nut breads are known also by many specific regional names.
Regional variations on nut rolls are part of weddings, for Easter and Christmas, as well as other celebrations and holidays.
Traditional nut rolls in Central and Eastern Europe, like makowiec and bejgli, are a special type of rolled log shape. These are generally made with walnut and/or poppy seed.

Banana bread Loudene Lenon Davis

3 mashed bananas, or at least 2 jars of baby food
10 tablespoons sour milk mixed with 1 teaspoon soda*
1/2 cup shortening
2 cups sugar
2 beaten eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 cups sifted flour
1/2 cup nuts
*Nine tablespoons of milk and one tablespoon of vinegar may be substituted for sour milk.
Cream the shortening and sugar, add the eggs, then add the bananas. Mix in the salt, flour, and sour milk. Add the nuts. Pour it into two greased pans and bake it for one hour at 350°. Makes two loaves.

Hot potato rolls Judy Morgan Penrod

2/3 cup shortening
2/3 cup sugar
1 cup mashed potatoes
1/4 cup lukewarm water
2 beaten eggs
1 1/3 cup hot potato water
1 package yeast
Put the shortening, sugar, and salt in the hot potato water. Dissolve the yeast in 1/4 cup of water. Add the eggs, mashed potatoes, yeast mixture, and flour to the first mixture which has been cooled to room temperature. Knead the dough.
It may be kept in the refrigerator for a few days. Shape it into your favorite dinner rolls, or it can be used for coffee cakes.

Angel biscuits Shirley Reeves

1 package dry yeast
1 cup warm water
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 cups buttermilk
Mix it well, using a wooden spoon. Add:
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
6 cups flour
Mix the dough until it is stiff. Do not knead it. It doesn’t need to let set to rise, but biscuits are better if they rise. The dough keeps in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Bake 10-15 minutes at 400°.

Hurry up yeast rolls Carolyn Russell Barnes

1 package active dry yeast
2 1/2 cups biscuit mix
3/4 cup warm (not hot) water
Dissolve the yeast in the warm water and stir it in the biscuit mix, beating vigorously. Turn the dough onto a pastry cloth or a board dusted with additional biscuit mix. Knead twenty times, or until it is smooth. Roll it out, and cut and shape it into rolls of your choice. Place them on a lightly greased baking sheet and cover them. Set them in a warm, draft-free place and let them rise for one hour. Brush them with butter then bake them at 400° for 10-15 minutes or until they are golden brown. Makes about sixteen rolls.

Fancy corn bread Bernice Lenon Nichols

2 cups self-rising cornmeal
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup oil
2 eggs
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1 1/2 cup buttermilk
1 cup cream style corn
Stir the ingredients well and bake it in a preheated 375° oven for twenty five minutes.

Protein-plus bread Carolyn Russell Barnes

2 egg yolks
4 egg whites
6 tablespoons cottage cheese
1 tablespoon flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 package artificial sweetener
Mix all of the ingredients except the egg whites together and let it stand for ten minutes.
Meanwhile, beat the egg whites until they are stiff. Fold them into the mixture, pour it into a no-stick loaf pan, and bake it for forty five minutes at 325° and twenty five more minutes at 200°.

Refrigerator rolls Carolyn Russell Barnes

This is an excellent recipe for rolls. The dough will keep in a refrigerator a week to ten days.
2 cups boiling water
1/2 cup cold water
1/4 cup lukewarm water
1 tablespoon salt
2 cakes yeast
2 tablespoons shortening
1 teaspoon sugar
2 eggs
8 cups plain flour
Mix the boiling water, 1/2 cup of sugar, salt, and shortening. Let it cool to lukewarm. Soften the yeast in 1/4 cup of lukewarm water and add one teaspoon of sugar, and stir it into the first mixture. Add the beaten eggs. Stir in half of the flour until it’s well mixed, then add the remainder of the flour. Mix, but do not knead, the dough. Cover it and let it set in the refrigerator for at least two hours. Shape it into balls, put it in a greased pan and let rise in a warm room until it is double in bulk, about three hours. Bake it in a 400° oven.

Favorite Sis’ biscuits Shirley Reeves

2 cups self-rising flour
pinch of salt
pinch of baking soda
1 cup buttermilk
Mix it until the dough holds together. Melt a little bacon grease in a pan and dip the dough in the grease on both sides, and place it in a baking pan. Bake it for 15-20 minutes at 425°. You can use sweet milk, but if so do not add the baking soda.

Double quick batter rolls Louise Wittbart Runge submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
2 tablespoons soft shortening
1 cup warm water
2 tablespoons sugar
2 1/4 cups water
1 package active dry yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg
In a mixing bowl, sprinkle the yeast into the water. Stir in the sugar, and half the flour and salt. Beat it until it is smooth. Add the egg and shortening then beat in the rest of the flour until it’s smooth, and scrape the sides of the bowl. Cover it and let it rise until it’s double, about 30 minutes. Oil twelve large muffin cups and stir down the batter. Spoon it into the cups, filling them about half full. Let them rise until the batter reaches the top, about 20-30 minutes. Bake them for 15-20 minutes at 400°.

Pumpkin Bread Beaulah Hawthorne Nehring submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
1 cup sugar
1 1/3 cups flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon cinnamon
4 beaten eggs
2/3 cup water
2 cups pumpkin (or 1 pound can)
Beat the eggs and mix it with the oil and water. Sift the dry ingredients and add them to the mixture. Stir in the pumpkin. Nuts are optional; I add 3/4 cup of finely chopped nuts. Pour it into four greased one pound coffee cans. Fill each can only half full. Bake them for one hour in a 350° oven. Leave them in the cans until they are cool.

Fudge pecan pie Susie Rowatt Etherton submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
1/2 cup butter
3 tablespoons cocoa
3/4 cup hot water
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup flour
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 small can evaporated milk
1 cup chopped pecans
Melt the butter in a medium sized saucepan. Add the cocoa and stir until it is dissolved. Add the hot water and stir it again. With a wire whisk, stir in the sugar, flour, salt, vanilla, and evaporated milk. Stir it until the batter is smooth. Mix in the pecans and pour it into a deep-dish pie shell. Bake it on a preheated cookie sheet at 350° for fifty minutes or until the custard sets.

Lemon nut bread Lou Emma Lenon Erby

2 beaten eggs
1/2 cup melted*
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup milk
grated rind of 1 lemon
1 1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup chopped nuts
Beat the ingredients well. Pour it into a buttered bread pan and bake it at 350° for fifty minutes. Take the juice from the lemon and add 1/3 cup of sugar. Pour the mixture over the hot bread as it is taken from the oven.
*Editor’s note: This is straight from the old cookbook. Melted what? Butter, perhaps?

Herb bread Shirley Eveland Woodward submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
1 tablespoon butter
1 cup cottage cheese heated to lukewarm
1 package dry yeast softened in 1/2 cup of warm water
1 tablespoon instant dry onion
2 teaspoons dill seed
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons sugar
Pour the above ingredients into a mixing bowl. Add one egg, the yeast mix, and 2 1/4-2 1/2 cups of sifted flour. Stir it well and cover it, and let it rise for one hour. Stir it down and pour it into a greased bread pan. Cover it and let it rise again for about another hour. Bake it in a 325° oven for 30-40 minutes, then brush it with butter.

Gooey coffee cake Kent J. Alstat

1/2 cup orange juice concentrate
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg
1/2 cup oil
1 cup milk
Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl and beat it for two minutes with an electric mixer on medium speed. Spread the batter into a greased 9x13 inch pan.
In a small bowl, mix together:
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup chopped pecans
1/2 cup softened margarine
Sprinkle it over the batter and bake it at 350° for 20-25 minutes. While the coffee cake is baking, mix together the following glaze to pour over the hot cake:
3/4 cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 tablespoon Milk

Beaumont corn bread Liz Piper Submitted by Louemma Smith
1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 cup yellow cornmeal
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
6 tablespoons picante sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup buttermilk
2 lightly beaten eggs
1/4 cup butter or margarine, melted and cooled
Combine the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in large bowl. Add the buttermilk, eggs, picante sauce, and butter. Stir it just until the ingredients are blended. Pour it into a well-greased eight inch square baking pan. Bake it at 425° for 25-30 minutes or until it is golden brown. Makes 6-8 servings.

Oatmeal pie Myrtle Cash Harper submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
3 eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup quick cooking oats
1 unbaked pie shell
1/4 cup dark corn syrup
Cream the butter and sugar together. Add the cinnamon, cloves, and salt, then stir in the syrup. Add the eggs, one at a time, stirring after each addition until they’re blended. Stir in the rolled oats and place it all in an unbaked pastry shell. Bake it at 350° for an hour, or until a knife blade comes out clean. When baking, the oatmeal forms a chewy, nutty crust on top.

Corn rye bread Bonnie Smith Wyatt

6 tablespoons yellow cornmeal
1/2 cup cold water
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon margarine
1 envelope dry yeast
2 1/2 cups rye flour
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup cold mashed potatoes
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1 cup boiling water
glaze (recipe follows)
Lightly grease and set aside a large bowl. Combine six tablespoons of cornmeal and the cold water in a two quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the boiling water and cook it for two minutes, stirring constantly. Stir in the salt and margarine and allow the mixture to cool to lukewarm. Combine the yeast, rye, all-purpose flour, potatoes, and one tablespoon of caraway seeds in a mixing bowl, and mix it well. Add the cornmeal mixture and blend it thoroughly. Turn it onto a lightly floured board and knead it until it is stiff, but still slightly mucky. Place it in the greased bowl, turning it to coat the entire surface. Cover it with plastic wrap and a hot, damp towel. Let it rise in a warm place until it has doubled in volume.
Grease a baking sheet and sprinkle it lightly with extra cornmeal. Punch the dough down, shape it into a loaf or two rounds and place it on a baking sheet. Cover it with plastic wrap and let it rise again until it has doubled in volume. Preheat the oven to 375° and bake it for forty minutes. Remove the bread from the oven, brush it lightly with the glaze and sprinkle it with extra caraway seeds. Return the bread to the oven for about five minutes or until the top is glazed and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Cool it on the rack. Makes one loaf or two rounds.
For the glaze, combine 1/4 cup water and 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch. Bring it to a boil in a small saucepan on high heat and let it boil for one minute.

Spoon rolls Susie Rowatt Etherton submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
2 cups warm water
1 package dry yeast
1/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup oil
1 beaten egg
Dissolve the yeast in warm water. Add the dry ingredients as listed. Use the mixture immediately or keep it covered in the refrigerator until it is needed. Bake it in greased muffin tins at 425° for 8-12 minutes or until it is golden brown. Use tablespoons to drop the dough into the tins.

Grape-Nut bread Lou Emma Lenon Erby

1/2 cup Grape-Nuts
1 cup sour milk or buttermilk (I like buttermilk best)
Soak the Grape-Nuts in milk. Add one scant cup of sugar and let it stand ten minutes or longer. Add one beaten egg. Also add:
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
Pour it into a buttered bread pan and bake it in a 350° oven for about an hour.

San Francisco sourdough bread Lou Emma Smith

1 cup flour
1 cup water
1 tablespoon sugar
1 cake yeast
1 1/2 cups warm Water
6 cups flour
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
this is a sourdough starter, start it 2-3 days in advance. Combine:
1 cup flour
1 cup water
1 tablespoon sugar
yeast
Let it stand in a small bowl in a warm place for 2-3 days, until it has fermented.
For the bread, combine the starter with 1 1/2 cups of warm water, four cups of flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and the remaining two teaspoons of sugar. Stir it vigorously for three minutes. Place it in a greased bowl, and cover it and let it rise until the dough has doubled in size. In another bowl, mix the baking soda and one cup of flour. Stir the risen dough. Place the dough on a floured surface and work in the remaining flour until the dough is smooth. Divide the dough In half and shape it into two oblong loaves. Place them on a lightly greased cookie sheet and let them rise until the loaves have doubled in size. Brush them with water and score the tops diagonally with a sharp knife. Bake them at 400° for 40-45 minutes.

Spicy carrot bread Steven R. Mann

2 cups whole wheat flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1 cup carrot purée
1/4 cup molasses
1/2 cup oil
1 egg
In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, salt, and spices. Mix the carrot purée, molasses, oil, and egg in a medium sized bowl and add it to the dry ingredients, stirring only to blend; do not beat it. Place it in a greased 10x5 inch loaf pan and bake it for 60-70 minutes or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.
Editor’s note: Carrot bread is a bread or quick bread that uses carrots as the primary ingredient. Various recipes may be prepared with grated, shredded carrots, or carrot juice. Baking times can vary depending on the amount of juice in the carrots used, and it may be a moist bread. Carrot bread may have an orange color derived from carrot juice or carrots used. Additional ingredients used in its preparation may include zucchini, buttermilk, eggs, milk, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, walnuts, ginger, and raisins. Carrot bread can be prepared as a sourdough and multigrain bread. It may eaten plain, served with butter, or topped with an icing or glaze. Carrot bread can be served as a means to increase vegetable intake in diets.
There is a similar recipe in this book, carrot cake. Many food historians believe carrot cake originated from Medieval carrot puddings eaten by Europeans.

Banana bread Tracee Alstat McMurray

1 cup softened shortening
2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 teaspoons lemon juice
4 eggs
4 mashed bananas
1 coarsely chopped banana
1/2 cup nuts (optional)
1 teaspoon salt
3 1/2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup sour cream
Cream the butter and sugar. Add the vanilla, lemon juice, and eggs, and beat it well. Stir in the mashed bananas. Sift together the salt, flour, baking soda, and baking powder.
Add the sour cream, nuts, and the coarsely chopped banana. Pour it into two greased 9x5 inch loaf pans. Bake it at 350° for 1 1/2 hours or until the surface springs back when touched. Cool it in the pans. Makes two loaves.
Editor’s note: Botanically, bananas are berries! There are many kinds of bananas, not all of which are edible, although they’re not poisonous, they just taste bad.
The fruit is variable in size, color, and firmness, but is usually elongated and curved, with soft flesh rich in starch covered with a rind, which may be green, yellow, red, purple, or brown when ripe. The fruits grow in clusters hanging from the top of the plant. Almost all modern edible parthenocarpic (seedless) bananas come from two wild species—Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana.

Hush puppies Steve Mann

1 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 beaten egg
1 medium onion, chopped fine
3/4-1 cup buttermilk
dash of each: garlic powder, onion powder, Worcestershire sauce
Combine the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Add the egg, buttermilk, onion, garlic and onion powders, and Worcestershire sauce. Mix it well. Drop it in deep hot oil by the spoonful and cook them until they’re brown on all sides.

Fluffy 7-Up biscuits Louemma Russell Smith

2 cups all-purpose flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup 7-Up
Sift the flour, salt, and baking powder into a bowl. Cut in the shortening until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the 7-Up all at once. Stir it briskly with a fork, only until the ingredients are evenly moistened.
Turn it onto a lightly floured surface and knead it 8-10 times. Roll it to 3/4 inch thick and allow it to rest a few minutes. Cut it and arrange it on a baking sheet. Bake it 10-12 minutes at 450°. Makes twelve two inch biscuits.

Coffee can bread Louemma Russell Smith

4 cups flour
1/2 cup water
1 teaspoon salt
1 package dry yeast
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/4 cup sugar
Measure 1 1/2 cups of flour into a mixing bowl. Blend the yeast into the flour. Put the water into a saucepan with the milk, oil, sugar, and salt, and heat it until it is warm. Add it to the flour mixture and beat it until it’s smooth. Stir in the eggs and the remaining flour. Divide it into two well-buttered one pound coffee cans. Cover them with the original plastic lids and let them rise for thirty five minutes. Remove the lids and bake them for thirty five minutes at 375°. Let them stand in the cans until the bread shrinks from the sides, and remove and slice it. Note: the plastic lids must fit tightly.
Editor’s note: See Grandma and the Family Recipes at the beginning of the book. Note that when this recipe was first written, coffee cans were made of metal. I’m not sure you could make this recipe today; it would certainly be difficult.

Honey yeast rolls Sherry Smith Alstat

2 packages active dry yeast
1 cup lukewarm water
3 1/2-4 cups flour
melted margarine
1 teaspoon salt
1 beaten egg
2 tablespoons honey
Dissolve the yeast in water. Combine two cups of flour and one teaspoon of salt. Add the dissolved yeast, 1/4 cup of margarine, the egg, and the honey; beat it until it’s smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a stiff dough. Place the dough in a greased bowl and brush it with margarine. Cover it and let it rise in a warm place about twenty minutes or until it has doubled in volume. Punch it down. With oiled fingers, shape it into one inch balls. Place three balls in each greased medium-sized muffin cup. Cover it and let it rise until it is double in volume, about twenty minutes. Brush it with margarine and bake it at 400° for 12-15 minutes, until lightly browned. Brush it with additional honey as soon as the rolls are removed from the oven, If desired. Makes about two dozen rolls.
Editor’s note: The illustration is of Langstroth beehives. Named for their inventor, Reverend Lorenzo Langstroth, Langstroth hives are not the only hives of this style, but the most common in North America. Langstroth patented his design in 1852, originally for comb honey production, and it has become the standard style hive for many of the world’s beekeepers. This class of hives includes other styles, which differ mainly in the size and number of frames used. These include Smith, British National, Segeberger Beute (German), D.E. hive, Frankenbeute (German), Normalmass (German), Langstroth hive, Modified Commercial, and Modified Dadant, plus regional variations.

Lickety-quick lemonade bread Sherry Smith Alstat

1/3 cup+1 tablespoon frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup milk
Preheat the oven to 350°. Combine all of the ingredients except 1/3 cup of lemonade in a large mixing bowl. Blend it well, then beat it for three minutes at medium speed of the mixer. Pour the batter into a greased 9x5 inch loaf pan and bake it for 50-60 minutes or until done when tested. Loosen it from the edges of the pan. Pour the reserved 1/3 cup of lemonade over the bread. Cool and remove it from the pan.

Apple date nut muffins Laura Gravot

2/3 cup butter or margarine
1 1/4 cups sugar
4 eggs
1 1/2 cups applesauce
1/2 cup milk
4 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup chopped nuts
1 cup chopped dates
1 teaspoon baking soda
Cream the butter and sugar together. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Stir in the applesauce and milk. Sift the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together. Add it to the applesauce mixture and mix it well. Stir in the dates and nuts. Pour it into greased muffin tins, filling them 2/3 full. Bake them in a 350° oven for 20-25 minutes, until the centers of the muffins test done. Makes twenty four muffins.

Three “C” bread Sherry Smith Alstat

1 tablespoon grated orange rind
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup chopped cranberries
3 beaten eggs
1/2 cup oil
1/2 cup milk
2 1/2 cups flour
1 1/4 cups sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cups grated carrots
1 1/3 cups coconut
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup raisins
In a large bowl, combine the eggs, oil, and milk. Stir in the dry ingredients just until blended. Stir in the carrots, coconut, cran-berries, nuts, orange rind, and raisins. Grease and flour four sixteen ounce vegetable cans. Fill them 2/3 full of batter. Bake it at 350° for 45-50 minutes. Remove it from the cans and let it cool. Wrap it in foil and store the extras in the refrigerator or wrap them in foil, or put in plastic zipper bags and put them in the freezer for later use. If desired, heat the foil-wrapped bread in a slow oven until warm. These mini-loaves make great gifts for friends and relatives.
Editor’s note: I was curious about the name of this bread, for which Wikipedia has no entry. Google found several recipes for breads with this name, and one said it was for “carrots, cherries, and coconut.” This recipe has cranberries rather than cherries.

Pecan pie Mabel Diebold

Prepare the pie crust, beat three eggs well, then add:
1/4 cup melted butter or margarine
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup dark syrup
1 cup pecans
Beat the eggs well. Add the other ingredients and pour them into the pie crust. Bake it for 1 hour at 375°.
Editor’s note: Check the index for pie crust recipes.

Luscious peach pie Denise Vrana Hollingsworth

1 nine inch baked pie shell
6 large fresh peeled peaches
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon unflavored gelatin
3 tablespoons cold water
Purée half of the peeled peaches in the blender. Stir in the sugar and lemon juice and set it aside. Combine the gelatin with cold water in a small bowl. Place the bowl over boiling water and stir it until the gelatin is dissolved; this can also be done in a microwave oven. Add the dissolved gelatin to the puréed peach mixture and mix it well. Refrigerate it until the mixture is slightly thicker than unbeaten egg white. Alternate layers of the chilled mixture and the remaining sliced peaches. Chill it for two hours or until it is well set. Serve it plain or with whipped topping.
Editor’s note: The illustration is Claude Monet’s Das Pfirsichglas (A jar of peaches).

Fresh strawberry pie Mabel Diebold

5 ounces strawberry gelatin
2 teaspoons flour
1/2 cup sugar
Bring two cups of water to a boil. Add it to the above ingredients, mix it well, and cook it for five minutes. Chill it until it is thick enough to pour half into a baked pie crust and add two cups of strawberries, each strawberry cut in half. Add the remaining gelatin on top and chill it. Serve it with whipped cream.

Hawaiian pie Linda Nichols

Make one graham cracker crust as directed on the box, or use a ready made crust.
3 bananas
1 can sweetened condensed milk
1/2 cup lemon juice
English walnuts or other nuts
1 can drained and crushed pineapple
whipped cream
coconut
maraschino cherries
Slice the bananas into the crust. Mix the milk and lemon juice together and pour it over the bananas. Sprinkle the pineapple on top of the milk. Spread whipped cream over the pineapple. Sprinkle coconut over the top and cut each of the cherries in half and put on the top, then add the English walnuts or any other chopped nuts.
Editor’s note: The illustration is Man with a Yoke Carrying Taro by Joseph Strong. It is in the Honolulu Museum of Art.

Cherry o’ cream cheese pie Loudene Lenon Davis

1 nine inch crumb crust or baked pastry shell
8 ounces cream cheese
15 ounces sweetened condensed milk
1/3 cup lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
6 ounces prepared cherry pie filling or cherry glaze
Let the cream cheese soften to room temperature, then whip it until it’s fluffy. Gradually add the condensed milk while continuing to beat the cheese until it’s well blended. Add the lemon juice and vanilla extract and blend it well. Pour it into the prepared crust and let it chill for 2-3 hours before garnishing the top of the pie with cherry pie filling or the following glaze:
1 cup drained pitted sour cherries
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoon cornstarch
1/2 cup cherry juice
Blend the sugar and cornstarch together, then add the cherry juice. Cook it until it’s thickened and clear, stirring constantly. Stir in a few drops of red food coloring if desired, and add cherries. Cool it and garnish the top of the pie.
Editor’s note: A cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy drupe, or “stone fruit”.
The cherry fruits of commerce usually are obtained from cultivars of a limited number of species such as the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) and the sour cherry (Prunus cerasus). The name “cherry” also refers to the cherry tree, and is sometimes applied to almonds and visually similar flowering trees in the genus Prunus. Prunus avium is often referred to specifically by the name “wild cherry” in the British Isles, although any species outside cultivation is “wild cherry”.

Tasty lemon pie Gladys Russell Morgan

Heat one cup of milk and one cup of water together in the top of a double boiler; hot, but not boiling. Mix together:
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
Add it slowly to the hot liquid, stirring all the time and continuing to cook. Slowly add three egg yolks and continue to stir. Add the juice of two lemons and one teaspoon of grated lemon rind. Continue to cook for one minute, then remove it from the stove and stir in one tablespoon of butter or margarine. When it is cool, pour it into the previously baked pie shell. Top it with meringue and brown it in a fairly hot oven.

Poor man’s pie Zona Bishop Lenon

1 cup sugar
2 cups water
3/4 cup flour
1 unbaked pie crust
Mix the sugar, flour, and water together and pour it into the crust. Dot it with three tablespoons of butter and sprinkle it with nutmeg. Bake it at 350° or when the blade of a knife inserted in the middle of the pie comes out clean.
This recipe was given to Peggy Vaughn Russel from Ethyl Bishop Vaughn.
Editor’s note: The illustration is of poor children during the great depression.

No crust apple pie Loudene Lenon Davis

6 large apples
2/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
2-4 tablespoons water
1/4 cup butter or margarine Slice the apples into a rather deep pie plate with no bottom crust. Sprinkle them with the sugar, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Dot it with butter. Crumb Top:
1 cup flour
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup brown sugar
Mix the sugar and butter and add the flour. Mix it well and sprinkle it over the top of the apples. Bake it in a 350° oven for about an hour. Serve it plain or with whipped cream.

Vinegar pie (mock lemon pie) Zona Bishop Lenon

2/3 cup sugar
2/3 cup hot water
1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon extract
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon butter (size of a hickory nut)
Cook it in a heavy saucepan as you would any pie filling, and pour it in a cooled, baked, pie shell. Top it with meringue.

French coconut pie Terrie Nichols

1 stick melted margarine
1 1/2 cups sugar
3 slightly beaten eggs
1 cup coconut
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 teaspoon vanilla
Combine the ingredients and pour them into an unbaked pastry shell. Bake it at 350° for about an hour. The top should be brown and the filling relatively firm. Top it with whipped cream.

Rhubarb custard pie Shirley Reeves

1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
3 slightly beaten eggs
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
4 cups rhubarb cut in one inch pieces and soaked in water for ten minutes
Combine the sugar, flour, and nutmeg, and beat it into the eggs. Stir in the slightly drained rhubarb. Line a nine inch pie plate with pastry and fill it with the rhubarb mixture. Dot it with butter or margarine and top it with a lattice-top crust and bake it in a 400° oven for 50-60 minutes. Cool it and cut it. Great with ice cream.

Sugar pie Bernice Lenon Nichols

4 eggs
1 cup cream
3 cups sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup butter
Beat the eggs until they are light. Add the sugar and cream it thoroughly. Add the butter and cream it again. Add the cup of cream and beat it again. Cook it in a double boiler, stirring constantly. Add the vanilla and stir it well. Pour it into a baked pie shell and cover it with meringue. Brown it in a moderately hot oven until it’s golden brown. This is a very old-time rich pie.

Egg custard pie Kay Lenon

4 slightly beaten eggs
1/2 cup sugar
dash of salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
3 cups scalded milk
nutmeg
Beat the sugar and eggs together and add a dash of salt. Add the vanilla and slowly add the scalded milk. Pour it into an unbaked pie shell and sprinkle it with nutmeg. Bake it in a very hot oven at 450° for ten minutes only. Reduce the temperature to 325° and bake it for 30-40 minutes more, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

Poor man’s pie Bernice Lenon Nichols

Place the following in the center of a chilled, unbaked pie crust:
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 cup water (some use milk instead of water)
1 teaspoon vanilla
Stir it with your fingers until it is all mixed well. Dot it with butter and bake it 25-30 minutes in a 350° oven until it’s done when tested.
This was handed down to me by my husband’s mother, Sarah Nichols.

Best milk pie Bernice Lenon Nichols (Lula Lenon)
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 cups milk
1/2 cup flour
pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla
Mix all of the ingredients well and pour them into an unbaked pie shell. Dot it with butter and bake it in a 450° oven for ten minutes, then bake for twenty more minutes at 350°. This is nice if strips of dough 1 1/2 inches wide are placed across the top before baking.
I have seen Mama make a half dozen of these pies at a time.
Editor’s note: The illustration is Jean-François Millet’s Woman Baking Bread (1854).

Rice pie Ann Lenon

7 large eggs
1 cup cooked, drained, and cooled rice
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup crushed and drained pineapple
1 teaspoon lemon extract
1 cup milk
4-5 graham crackers
Grease the bottom and sides of an 8x8 inch pan with soft butter. Crush 4-5 graham crackers with a rolling pin and dust the pan with them. Mix all the other ingredients together and pour them into the prepared pan and sprinkle some cinnamon and nutmeg on top. Bake it at 350° for one hour. Insert a knife in the center and if the knife is dry, it’s done.

Schilling’s rhubarb pie Elizabeth “Bette” Mann Setzkorn submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
3 cups rhubarb
1 cup white sugar, divided
1 unbaked 8 or 9 inch pie crust
pinch of salt
some cinnamon
Put the raw rhubarb in the pie shell and add 1/2 cup sugar and the salt. Beat the eggs with 1/2 cup sugar until they are yellow and fluffy. Pour it over the rhubarb and sugar in the shell. Sprinkle it lightly with cinnamon and bake it at 350° for forty five minutes or until it’s firm. It makes a delicious custard.

Butter pie Zona Bishop Lenon

3/4 cup sugar
1 scant cup flour
2 cups milk
Mix it together and pour it into an unbaked pie crust. Dot it with three tablespoons of butter and sprinkle it with cinnamon. Bake it at 400° for ten minutes, then reduce the heat to 350° and finish baking.

Apricot fried pies Kathryn “Beckie” Kent Erby

Drain one large can of apricots. Roll your your favorite pie dough to a six inch round. Place diced fruit (mashed and sprinkled with a little sugar) on the dough and fold it over. Crimp the edges of the dough with a fork, and prick holes in one side of the pie with a fork.
Put cooking oil about a quarter inch deep in a skillet on medium heat. Fry it on both sides until it’s golden brown. Drain it on a paper towel. You may use peaches, apples, or your favorite pie filling in place of apricots. Apricot pies are my daughter Beckie’s favorite.
Editor’s note: The image is of apricots drying in the sun.

Moon pie Myrtle Cash Harper submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby

Use a regular pie crust and roll it into a large round circle, twice as large as usual. Put it in the middle of a pie plate.
1 tablespoon tapioca
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup coconut
1 teaspoon apple pie spice or cinnamon
Mix the above ingredients and spread them in the bottom of the pie crust. Peel and slice about six medium apples and mound them high in the crust. Dot them with about one cut up stick of butter, and sprinkle it with sugar.
Fold the crust up over the apples; the crust forms an open circle on top. Flute the edges and bake it for fifteen minutes at 425°, then turn the oven down to 350°. Cook it until the apples are tender, about forty five minutes longer.
Myrtle’s youngest son, Chuck, says this is the best pie he has ever eaten.
Editor’s note: Moon pie was never eaten on the moon. The first image is of the late Pete Conrad on the moon during the Apollo 12 mission. The second photo is an Earthrise as seen from the moon.

Pie crusts Lou Emma Lenon Erby

This recipe makes five single crusts. Freeze the extras.
4 cups flour
1 tablespoon sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 3/4 cups shortening
1 tablespoon vinegar
1 egg
1/2 cup cold water
Mix the first three ingredients well. Cut in the shortening and mix it well until the ingredients are crumbly. Mix together the egg, water, and vinegar and add it to the dry ingredients, and mix it well. Separate it into five balls. Refrigerate it for twenty minutes before using it.

Green tomato pie Lou Emma Lenon Erby

3 cups sliced green tomatoes
3 tablespoons flour
1 1/3 cups sugar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 teaspoons grated lemon rind
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 pie crusts
Combine the tomatoes with the sugar, flour, salt, lemon juice, and rind. Place it in the bottom crust. Sprinkle it with cinnamon and dot it with butter, and cover it with the top crust. Bake it at 450° for ten minutes, then reduce the heat to 350° and bake for 30 more minutes.

Chess pie Bonnie Smith Wyatt

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg (optional)
1/2 cup melted butter or margarine
3 whole eggs
2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons cornmeal
1/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 tablespoon vinegar
1 unbaked pie shell
Beat the eggs and add the remaining ingredients, and mix them well. Turn it into the unbaked pie shell and bake it for forty five minutes at 350°.
Editor’s note: According to James Beard’s American Cookery (1972), chess pie was brought from England originally and was found in New England as well as Virginia.
The origin of the name “chess pie” is unknown, but many theories and folklore have been proposed. The term may have come from the term “pie chest,” in which chess pies could be stored because of their high sugar content. Another guess is that it came from a pronunciation of “cheese pie”, because the recipes of lemon chess pie and English lemon curd (cheese) are similar. Alternatively, it could have come from a pronunciation of “It’s jes’ pie”. Another proposal is that the pie was eaten in a room set to play chess in. The last guess seems to be the most unlikely to me.

Pumpkin meringue pie Tracee Alstat McMurray

1 cup cooked and mashed pumpkin
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup coconut
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/3 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3 beaten egg yolks
1 baked pie shell
Blend the sugar, flour, salt, and baking powder together, then stir in the milk gradually. Add the egg yolks and pumpkin and mix it well. Cook it about twenty minutes or until it’s creamy, stirring frequently. Remove it from the heat and stir in the coconut and vanilla. Pour it into a pie shell.
To make the meringue, beat three egg whites until soft peaks form. Add a dash of salt and 1/3 cup of sugar gradually, and one teaspoon vanilla. Beat it until stiff peaks form. Spread it over the pie, sprinkle it with coconut, and bake it at 350° until it’s browned.

Pie crust Shirley Reeves

5 cups flour
2 cups shortening
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg plus 2 tablespoons vinegar plus cold water to equal 1 cup
Mix it together and refrigerate it for fifteen minutes before rolling it out. It will keep one month in the refrigerator, or it can be frozen.

Miracle pie Nikki Jo Wyatt

3 egg whites
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
3/4 cup nuts
1 cup cracker crumbs
Preheat the oven to 350° and grease an eight inch pie plate. Break the eggs and separate the whites from the yolks. Beat the whites until they are stiff. Add the sugar, baking powder, and vanilla to the egg whites. Fold in the nuts and add the cracker crumbs. Pour it into an eight inch pie pan and bake it for thirty minutes.
Editor’s note: The illustration is Reuben’s portrait of Daniel in the lion’s den, as told in Daniel 6:23.

Coconut macaroon pie Shirley Reeves

Beat together:
4 separated eggs
1 3/4 cups sugar
1/3 cup milk
1 3/4 cups coconut
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 teaspoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons melted margarine
Beat the egg whites, fold them into the above mixture and put it in the pie crust. Bake it at 400° for ten minutes, then reduce the heat to 350°. Bake it until it’s golden brown.

Strawberry glacé pie Maxine Smith Mann

1 nine inch baked pie shell
6 cups fresh strawberries
1 cup sugar
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 cup water
3 ounces softened cream cheese
Wash enough berries to measure one cup. Stir together the sugar and cornstarch. Gradually stir in the water and crushed strawberries. Cook it over medium heat, stirring constantly until the mixture is thick and boils. Boil it and stir for one minute, then let it cool. Beat the cream cheese until it is smooth, and spread it on the bottom of the baked pie shell. Fill the shell with the remaining berries and pour the cooked berry mixture over top. Chill it at least three hours or until set.

Impossible coconut pie Louemma Russell Smith

4 eggs
1 3/4 cups sugar
2 cups milk
1/2 stick melted margarine
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup shredded coconut, about 7 ounces
1/2 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
Beat the eggs until they are light. Add all the other ingredients except the coconut and vanilla and mix it well. Gently fold in the coconut and vanilla.
Grease and flour two nine inch pie pans and pour half of the mixture into each. Bake them at 350° for 30 minutes. This pie makes its own crust, believe it or not!

Cream cheese pie Shirley Reeves

8 ounces cream cheese
1/2 cup sugar
Mix it well and fold in:
9 ounces whipped cream
20 ounces drained and crushed pineapple
Put it in a nine or ten inch pie shell and refrigerate it.

No-fail flaky pie dough Vic Lenon

This makes two nine inch double crusts and one shell, or five nine inch single crusts. Be sure to let the dough rest at least thirty minutes in the refrigerator before rolling it. It can be kept up to three days in the refrigerator or you can divide it into five balls and freeze it in plastic bags.
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 3/4 cups vegetable oil
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon vinegar
1 egg
1/2 cup water
Mix the flour, shortening, sugar, and salt together with a fork. In a separate bowl, beat the other ingredients together, then combine the two mixes and stir it with a fork until of all the ingredients are moistened. Mold it into separate balls by hand. Chill it before rolling it.
This is a great recipe for beginners. It can take a good deal of handling and still comes up flaky.

Biscuit dough for shortcake Bertha V. Bongiorno

2 cups flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
2 tablespoons sugar
3/4 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup shortening
Mix the dry ingredients and work in the shortening. Add the milk and toss it on a board and pat or roll it. Cut it with a biscuit cutter and bake it in the oven 12-15 minutes at 450°. Split the biscuits and fill them with sweetened fruit.

Coconut macaroon pie Myrtle Cash Harper submitted by Lou Emma Lenon Erby
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup margarine or butter
1/4 cup flour
1/2 cup milk
1 1/2 cups shredded coconut
1 nine inch unbaked pie shell
Beat the sugar, eggs, and salt until the mixture is lemon colored. Add the butter and flour and blend it well. Add the milk, and fold in one cup of coconut.
Pour it in the pie shell. Top it with the remaining coconut and bake it at 325° for about an hour.

Zucchini bran muffins Gayle Barnes Walker

1 cup flour
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 beaten egg
3/4 cup milk
3 tablespoons oil
1 cup bran
1/2 cup grated zucchini, squeezed dry
1/3 cup chopped nuts
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
Heat the oven to 400° and grease the muffin cups. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and soda. Blend the egg, milk, and oil. Stir in the bran cereal and let set for five minutes. Add the last three ingredients and mix it to combine them. Stir it into the flour just until it’s blended. Fill the muffin cups 2/3 full and bake them for 20-25 minutes.
Editor’s note: Zucchini is a summer squash which can reach nearly a yard in length, but is usually harvested immature at six to ten inches. In Britain and Ireland a fully grown zucchini is referred to as a marrow. In South Africa it is known as a baby marrow.
Along with certain other squashes and pumpkins, it belongs to the species Cucurbita pepo. Zucchini can be dark or light green. A related hybrid, the golden zucchini, is a deep yellow or orange color.
In a culinary context, zucchini is treated as a vegetable; it is usually cooked and presented as a savory dish or accompaniment. Botanically, zucchinis are fruits, a type of botanical berry called a “pepo”, being the swollen ovary of the zucchini flower. The female flower is a golden blossom on the end of each emergent zucchini.

Dutch apple fritters Lou Emma Smith

6 apples; peeled, cored, and cut into 1/2 inch rings
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brandy
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 separated eggs
2/3 cup milk
1 tablespoon melted butter
1 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
Place the apple rings in a large bowl with 1/2 cup sugar, brandy, and cinnamon. Let it marinate in the refrigerator for an hour.
For the batter, Beat together two egg yolks, milk, and melted butter. Add the flour and one tablespoon of sugar and stir it. Let it stand for 1-2 hours at room temperature.
Heat an inch of oil to 375° in a skillet. While the oil is heating, beat two egg whites until they are stiff, then fold them into the batter. Drain the apples and dip the rings, one at a time, into the batter. Fry the coated apple rings in oil until golden brown, turning to brown both sides. Sprinkle with con-fectioners sugar.
Editor’s note: A very delicious way to fritter away your time!

Pecan tarts Elizabeth Russell Vrana

Crust:
2 cups flour
6 ounces cream cheese
2 sticks margarine
a dash of salt
Cream these ingredients together, then line a small miniature muffin tin with crust, twelve to a tin. For the filling:
2 eggs
2 tablespoons margarine
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 cups chopped pecans
Fill the muffin cups halfway and bake it for about twenty minutes at 350°.
This recipe makes forty eight tarts or four tins of twelve each, and can be made ahead of time and frozen. It also makes an ideal crust for pecan pie.
Editor’s note: the illustration is of the aforementioned pecan pie. It is considered a specialty of Southern U.S. Cuisine; pecans are native to the southern United States. Archaeological evidence found in Texas indicates that Native Americans used pecans more than 8,000 years ago. The word “pecan” is a derivative of an Algonquin word, pakani, referring to several nuts.
Sugar pies such as treacle tart were attested in Medieval Europe, and adapted in North America to the ingredients available. Pecan pie may be a variant of chess pie, which is made with a similar butter-sugar-egg custard.

Soft Pretzels Laura Gravot and Kent Alstat

1 package dry yeast
1 1/3 cups warm water
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 1/2-4 cups flour
1 egg
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons coarse salt or sesame seeds
Grease two large baking sheets. Sprinkle the yeast over the warm water in a large bowl and stir it with a rubber spatula until the yeast is dissolved. Stir in the sugar and salt until they are dissolved. Gradually stir in 3 1/2 cups of flour with a wooden spoon until a stiff dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a well floured surface and knead it until it’s smooth, about 5-7 minutes, adding another 1/2 cup flour of if necessary. Divide the dough into twelve equal portions. Cover it with a towel and let the dough rest about ten minutes for easier shaping. Roll each piece of dough into a fifteen inch long rope. Shape the rope into a pretzel shape and place it on a baking sheet. Beat the egg and water together in a small bowl and brush it on the pretzels. Sprinkle them with coarse salt or sesame seeds. Bake in a 425° oven for 15-25 minutes or until they’re golden brown. They’re very good warm or cold.

 
 


 
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